Sustainability: Finding a way out of the hole.

Amongst the first to grow cotton in the MacIntyre Valley,
the Coulton family know only too well the role innovation and technology play in driving Australia’s farming efficiency.

Finding an alternative solution to textile waste is simply the next step.
That's why we're launching FARM FILL - our sustainability program that returns end of life Goondiwindi Cotton garments back to where it all began.

How you can you help?

We're launching FARM FILL - our sustainability program that returns end of life Goondiwindi Cotton garments back to the farm to aid soil health and reduce textile waste.

To get involved, simply register your details below and we'll send you a packing slip to return your garment/s. Plus, you'll also receive an exclusive 10% discount to apply to your next purchase.

Take Action

Step One

Register your interest to participate in this program & we'll send you an email with all the details.

Step Two

Clean out your wardrobe and send back your old Goondiwindi Cotton garments

Step Three

Treat yourself to something new and shop our latest collections with 10% off your next purchase. Not only will you look good, but you’ll feel great too!


The Challenge

One - Australian has some of the most carbon poor soils in the world. This is a challenge as the organic carbon content of soil is a key indicator of its health and ability for productive agricultural use.

Two - Every year approximately 800,000 tones of textiles end up in Australia’s landfills. Fashion is becoming increasingly disposable, with almost a quarter of Australian’s admitting to throwing away clothes after just one wear.

The Project

The Circular Cotton project, under the guidance of circular economy specialists Coreo, is a partnership between the Queensland Government, Goondiwindi Cotton, Sheridan, Cotton Australia, Worn Up and Cotton Research and Development Corporation funded soil scientist Dr Oliver Knox.

Around two tonnes of cotton textiles, garments, end of life emergency services uniforms and Sheridan Sheets have been processed at Worn Up in Sydney, transported to “Alcheringa” farm, and spread onto a cotton field by local farmer, Sam Coulton.

The field is being prepared for planting the next cotton crop in October. It’s hoped the fabrics will break down in the soil, increase microbial activity, lock in carbon and provide cover to improve soil moisture.


“In this day and age, we should be part of the solution for taking cotton right back through the system. We grow it here and we should be able to bury it here with positive environmental and economic impact on the local community."

- Sam Coulton, Alcheringa Farm, Goondiwindi Cotton